It’s that time when physical desire takes over. In the aftermath of a fashion event in Bangkok, Pune-based executive and happily-married-for-five-years Urvil Raisingh (Tanuj Virwani) encounters (due to a wager between friends) Celina (Sunny Leone). In a single day, they begin to love each other’s company and have a one-night stand — no holds barred and no strings attached. The trouble is, they have lied to each other, either by omission or commission.

The next morning, Celina is untraceable, even in the hotel where all the guests are staying, as there is no one named Celina who had stayed there, and Urvil returns to home and hearth, complete with his libidinous and loving wife (Nyra Banerjee) and a fairly good circle of friends, led by office colleague and senior David (Ninad Kamath).

David advises him to forget his episode of cheating on his wife and also the woman. But a chance encounter with Celina at a Pune mall leaves Urvil realizing that he cannot get over her. A frantic search on the Internet yields nothing, till one day he meets her at a party under her real identity — Mrs. Amber Kapoor, wife of a tycoon. Amber too has a happy family, complete with a doting husband (Khalid Siddique), kid and loving father-in-law (Kanwaljeet Singh).

After this, Urvil loses his mental balance and wants to meet her, but she is adamant as well as apprehensive. When they finally meet, Amber tries to drill some sense into his head, but, by that time, he has lost all ideas of logic and a sense of responsibility to his wife, job and everything else. Stalker, blackmailer, villain in her life — Urvil becomes all.

And then comes the moment of reckoning — with his wife, boss and finally Amber. The open ending is a bit of a surprise and quite abrupt, but, under the circumstances, it could probably be the only sensible denouement through which Amber faces possible exorcism from her guilt, and Urvil arrives at a crossroads in his life.

At 1.39 hours, the film is crisp and tight, and the placidity with which the film moves while covering everything with a sincere intensity and completeness is commendable for D’Souza, a first-time director, who also brings in her sensitive and soft sensibility to the role. While the dialogues are largely serviceable and occasionally effective and hard-hitting, we did not like certain clumsy elements, such as the silly outburst by Urvil at his anniversary outing that seems extremely fake, and the general clumsy setup in Amber’s home with her father-in-law’s and husband’s characters looking plain, unnatural and unreal.

Technically, the film is fine in almost all departments, and the music is just about alright. As for the performances, we like Leone’s attempt to get better (with each film actually), and she manages that to a fair extent here. Banerjee is nice. But the acting honors go to Kamath, note-perfect as the well-meaning, very concerned and sometimes justifiably interfering friend, and youngster Virwani, who, but for some occasional minor lapses in expression, comes across as perfect for the role and adroit in his execution of Urvil.

And make no mistake: This is Leone’s most classy film to date. And she deserves to do more of such movies.

Rating: ***

Swiss Entertainment presents “One Night Stand”

Producers: Furquan Khan and Pradeep Sharma

Directed by: Jasmini Moses D’Souza

Written by: Bhavani Iyer and Niranjan Iyengar

Music: Meet Bros, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar and Vivek Kar

Starring: Sunny Leone, Tanuj Virwani, Nyra Banerjee, Ninad Kamath, Narendra Jetley, Khalid Siddique, Kanwaljeet and others

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