Netflix Rushdie

British Indian novelist Salman Rushdie’s seminal work of fiction, “Midnight’s Children,” is being adapted into a TV series by Netflix. (Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images)

Netflix is set to adapt British Indian author Salman Rushdie’s 1981 novel, “The Midnight’s Children,” into a TV series.

The internet entertainment service announced that the original series, based on Rushdie’s seminal work of fiction, will be available to Netflix members in 190 countries around the world.

“Midnight’s Children,” according to a press release, follows the life of Saleem Sinai, born on the stroke of midnight Aug. 15, 1947, the time of India’s independence. His every act is mirrored and magnified in events that sway the course of India’s national affairs; his health and well-being are inextricably bound to those of his nation; his life is inseparable, at times indistinguishable, from the history of his country. Perhaps most remarkable are the telepathic powers linking him with India’s 1,000 other “midnight’s children,” all born in that initial hour and endowed with magical gifts.

“I am absolutely delighted that ‘Midnight’s Children’ will have a new life on Netflix, and greatly look forward to working with them to help create it,” said Rushdie.

“Midnight’s Children” is a literary tour de force that has won multiple accolades, including the 1981 Booker Prize, the Best of the Booker twice – both in 1993 and 2008 – and the James Tait Memorial Prize. The critically acclaimed and hugely successful novel is considered by some to be amongst the 100 best novels of all time by the Modern Library. It is considered a groundbreaking example of postcolonial, postmodern and magic realist literature.

“‘Midnight’s Children’ is one of the great novels of the world, and its themes are still relevant to the India of today,” said Erik Barmack, vice president of international originals at Netflix. “The narrative continues to fascinate audience decades after it was first published. We are incredibly excited to translate this pioneering work of fiction that parallels the birth of modern India for a global audience.”

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