WASHINGTON, D.C. — Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi has been conferred Harvard University's prestigious Humanitarian Award for this year in recognition of his continuing contribution to the cause of child rights.

The annual award by the prestigious university is given to an individual whose works and deeds have served to improve the quality of lives and have inspired us to greater heights. Satyarthi is the first Indian to have been given this award.

The university said the “Harvard Humanitarian of the Year” has been awarded to Satyarthi for his contributions in the field of child rights and abolition of child slavery.

Satyarthi recently succeeded in getting child protection and welfare-related clauses included in the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations, which aim to end slavery, trafficking, forced labor and violence.

"I humbly accept the award on behalf of millions of left-out children, for whose rights we strive to work for. Let us all pledge together to eradicate child slavery from the world," the social activist said in his acceptance speech Oct. 16.

"Even developed countries, including the Unites States, have hundreds of slaves who are forced into labor, pushed into the sex trade or trafficked into domestic labor. Undocumented immigrants, people in the margins of the society are pulled into a circuit of slavery," he said.

Each year, the Harvard Foundation presents the Humanitarian Award to people whose work and deeds have served to improve society and inspire people to achieve greater heights.

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