Purdue Center

Kaushik Roy, the Edward G. Tiedemann Jr. Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, will serve as director of the Purdue University Center for Brain-inspired Computing Enabling Autonomous Intelligence. “The center’s goal is to develop neuro-inspired algorithms, architectures and circuits for perception, reasoning and decision-making, which today’s standard computing is unable to do efficiently,” the Indian American professor said. (Purdue University/John Underwood photo)

Purdue University Jan. 24 celebrated its new Center for Brain-inspired Computing Enabling Autonomous Intelligence, or C-BRIC, and named Indian American Kaushik Roy as its director.

Purdue will lead the national center to develop brain-inspired computing for intelligent autonomous systems such as drones and personal robots capable of operating without human intervention, the university said.

The event featured speeches by Roy, who also serves as the Edward G. Tiedemann Jr. Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, university president Mitch Daniels, and Mung Chiang, the John A. Edwardson Dean of the College of Engineering.

Anand Raghunathan, C-BRIC associate director and professor of electrical and computer engineering, also was on hand, the university said.

Researchers at C-BRIC will work to develop autonomous intelligent systems capable of reasoning and decision-making to complete mission-critical tasks without human intervention, Roy said in a statement.

The five-year project is supported with a $27 million grant from the Semiconductor Research Corp. via its Joint University Microelectronics Program, which provides funding from a consortium of industrial sponsors as well as from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the university said.

Other Purdue faculty involved in the center include Suresh Jagannathan, professor of computer science and ECE; and Eugenio Culurciello, associate professor of biomedical engineering, ECE and mechanical engineering.

“The center’s goal is to develop neuro-inspired algorithms, architectures and circuits for perception, reasoning and decision-making, which today’s standard computing is unable to do efficiently,” Roy said.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.