sae kamasamudram

Krishna Kamasamudram is a technical adviser, catalyst technology and integration group, at Cummins. (cummins.com photo)

SAE International recently announced its 2020 cohort of Fellows, with Indian American Krishna Kamasamudram named among the 17 engineers and scientists from industry and academia.

Kamasamudram is a technical adviser, catalyst technology and integration group, at Cummins.

He has doctoral degree in catalysis from Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, India followed by which he worked at TU Delft, The Netherlands for several years before joining Cummins, according to a press release.

For the last decade plus, both at academia and at Cummins, Kamasamudram has been working on aftertreatment catalyst technologies. He has developed advanced concepts for preparation and the use of very active soot oxidation catalysts for CDPF, selective catalytic reduction and ammonia slip catalyst technologies.

He made seminal contributions to the fundamental understanding of the working principles of DPF, SCR and ASC technologies.

He has published more than 40 articles in the area of aftertreatment catalysis in various journals of reputation.

Kamasamudram is an active member of SAE, AIChE and other catalysis societies and he coordinated and chaired a number conference sessions dealing with pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions, his bio notes.

Established in 1975, SAE Fellowship status is the highest grade of membership bestowed by SAE International. This new class honors long-term members and volunteers who have made a significant impact on society’s mobility technology through leadership, research and innovation, a news release said.

Those elected to the Fellowship are recognized for their outstanding engineering and scientific accomplishments that have resulted in meaningful advances in automotive, aerospace and commercial-vehicle technology.

SAE International is a global association committed to being the ultimate knowledge source for the engineering profession, with more than 128,000 engineers and technical experts.

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