Cornell Gadikota:

Cornell University’s Greeshma Gadikota, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and Croll Sesquicentennial Fellow, was awarded with an early career research program grant by the U.S. Department of Energy. (cornell.edu photo)

Cornell University Aug. 1 announced that three members of its faculty, including Indian American Greeshma Gadikota, have been honored with an early career research program grant by the U.S. Department of Energy.

All three – Gadikota, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and Croll Sesquicentennial Fellow; Jared Maxson, assistant professor of physics; and Brad Ramshaw, assistant professor of physics – will receive at least $750,000 over five years to support their scientific endeavors.

Gadikota will use the funds to pursue her research in developing clean methods for storing and delivering energy, while simultaneously converting the carbon dioxide created in energy production to a useful, environmentally harmless solid. For example, converting carbon dioxide to calcium or magnesium carbonate would create a potential construction material, according to a Cornell news release.

Gadikota aims to harness X-ray scattering techniques to observe chemical reactions as they occur, which could yield information enabling researchers to produce hydrogen without creating greenhouse gases, or to observe the reaction environments for any solid-liquid-gas system.

“We want to uncover the whole story,” she said in a statement. “And by doing this we hope to develop techniques that are scientifically universal.”

Gadikota joined the College of Engineering faculty in 2019. She received her bachelor’s degree in 2007 from Michigan State University and her doctorate in chemical engineering in 2014 from Columbia University. At Cornell, she also directs the Sustainable Energy and Resource Recovery Group.

Gadikota, Maxson and Ramshaw are among 73 scientists nationwide awarded grants from the Department of Energy’s early career program in 2019. Now in its 10th year, the program aims to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by supporting exceptional researchers during their crucial early career years, when many scientists do their most career-defining work.

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